Edward Bulwer-Lytton Quotes

Most popular Edward Bulwer-Lytton Quotes

Fate laughs at probabilities.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

fate

The pen is mightier than the sword.

words writing famous

Remorse is the echo of a lost virtue.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton Zanoni

remorse

A good man does good merely by living.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Goodness

Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm.

enthusiasm

Nature's loving proxy, the watchful mother.

mother

'Tis at sixty a man learns how to value home.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton
Castles in the air cost a vast deal to keep up.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

common sense

Talent does what it can; genius does what it must.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

talent talent & genius genius

One vice worn out makes us wiser than fifty tutors.

vice

Reading without purpose is sauntering, not exercise.

reading

Fate is not the ruler, but the servant of Providence.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

fate

A fool flatters himself—a wise man flatters the fool.

foolishness

A good heart is better than all the heads in the world.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

heart head and heart

Love sacrifices all things to bless the thing it loves.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

love

Great men gain doubly when they make foes their friends.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

enemies

Dream manfully and nobly, and thy dreams shall be prophets!

dreams

There's no weapon that slays its victim so surely as praise.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

praise

A mind once cultivated will not lie fallow for half an hour.

mind

The public man needs but one patron, namely, the lucky moment.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton
How a little praise warms out of a man the good that is in him.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

praise persuasion

The truest eloquence is that which holds us too mute for applause.

eloquence

Earnest men never think in vain though their thoughts may be errors.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

earnestness

If you wish to be loved, show more of your faults than your virtues.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

shortcomings

A good cigar is as great a comfort to a man as a good cry to a woman.

cigars men and women

We lose the peace of years when we hunt after the rapture of moments.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton
A good cigar is as great a comfort to a man as a good cry is to a woman.

cigars smoking

Chance happens to all, but to turn chance to account is the gift of few.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton
A reform is a correction of abuses; a revolution is a transfer of power.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

revolution

Invention is nothing more than a fine deviation from, or enlargement on a fine model.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton
When a man is down in the world, an ounce of help is better than a pound of preaching.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

helping others

Nothing is so agonizing to the fine skin of vanity as the application of a rough truth!

truth vanity

When a person's down in the world, I think an ounce of help is better than a pound of preaching.
The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another man's observation, not overturning it.

conversation

When we look back upon human records, how the eye settles upon writers as the main landmarks of the past.

writers

It seems to me that the coming of love is like the coming of spring; the date is not to be reckoned by the calendar.

love

Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame — to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a hell.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

fame

In science, read, by preference, the newest works; in literature, the oldest. The classic literature is always modern.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

literature science

The best teacher is the one who suggests rather than dogmatizes, and inspires his listener with the wish to teach themselves.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

for teachers teaching

The worst part of an eminent man's conversation is, nine times out of ten, to be found in that part which he means to be clever.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

conversation

Common sense is only a modification of talent. Genius is an exaltation of it. The difference is, therefore, in degree, not nature.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

common sense genius talent

How many of us have been incited to reason, have first learned to think, to draw conclusions, to extract a moral from the follies of life, by some dazzling aphorism.

aphorisms

Youth, beauty, pomp, what are these, in point of attraction, to a woman's heart, when compared to eloquence?  The magic of the tongue is the most dangerous of all spells.

eloquence tongue

Every street has two sides, the shady side and the sunny. When two men shake hands and part, mark which of the two takes the sunny side; he will be the younger man of the two.

youth & age

It is only in some corner of the brain which we leave empty that Vice can obtain a lodging.  When she knocks at your door, my son, be able to say, "No room for your ladyship—pass on."

vice

Philosophers have done wisely when they have told us to cultivate our reason rather than our feelings, for reason reconciles us to daily things of existence; our feelings teach us to yearn after the far, the difficult, the unseen.
— Edward Bulwer-Lytton

reason feelings