Alexander Pope Quotes

Most popular Alexander Pope Quotes

How vast a memory has Love!
— Alexander Pope
Persuasion is better than force.
— Alexander Pope
At every word a reputation dies.

reputation

The proper study of Mankind is Man.
— Alexander Pope

mankind

Beauty draws us with a single hair.

hair

To err is human, to forgive divine.
— Alexander Pope

mistakes

To err is human, to forgive, divine.
— Alexander Pope

mistakes

To err is human; to forgive, divine.

error forgiveness

All gardening is landscape painting.

garden

Beauty draws us with a single hair."
— Alexander Pope
Nature requires little — fancy, much.
— Alexander Pope
One science only will one genius fit.
— Alexander Pope
Not to go back is somewhat to advance.
— Alexander Pope
Health consists with temperance alone.
— Alexander Pope

health

Who shall decide when doctors disagree?
— Alexander Pope
A little learning is a dangerous thing.

learning

An honest man's the noblest work of God.

honesty

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
— Alexander Pope
Take the tone of the company you are in.
— Alexander Pope
Keep good humor still, whatever we lose.
— Alexander Pope
Truth shines the brighter clad in verse.

truth

Hope springs eternal in the human breast.

breasts hope

Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

foolishness Fools

What will a child learn sooner than a song?
— Alexander Pope
Who love too much hate in the same extreme.
— Alexander Pope
Absent or dead, still let a friend be dear.
— Alexander Pope
Sometimes Virtue starves, while Vice is fed.

vice & virtue

Men dream in courtship, but in wedlock wake.
— Alexander Pope
Act well your part, there all the honor lies.
— Alexander Pope
Those move easiest who have learned to dance.
— Alexander Pope

dance

They can paint them who shall feel them most.
— Alexander Pope
Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.
— Alexander Pope
Just as the twig is bent, the tree is inclined.
— Alexander Pope
Their praise is lost who waits till all commend.
— Alexander Pope
Authors, like coins, grow dear as they grow old.

authors

Charm strikes the sight, but merit wins the soul.
— Alexander Pope
Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.
— Alexander Pope

charm merit

Heaven from all creatures hides the book of fate.
— Alexander Pope
A family is but too often a commonwealth of malignants.
— Alexander Pope

family

A family is but too often but a commonwealth of malignants.

family

To be angry is to revenge the fault of others upon ourselves.

anger

[Adolescence is the time] when the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.
— Alexander Pope

adolescence

A disputant no more cares for the truth than the sportsman for the hare.

arguments

Music resembles poetry; in each are nameless graces which no methods teach.
— Alexander Pope
With Pleasure own your Errors past,
And make each day a Critic on the last.

error

A man of business may talk of philosophy; a man who has none may practice it.
— Alexander Pope

philosophers

We may see the small value God has for riches, by the people he gives them to.

wealth

Satire's my weapon, but I'm too discreet
To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet.

satire

O happiness! Our being's end and aim! For which we bear to live, or dare to die.
— Alexander Pope
In faith and hope the world will disagree, but all mankind's concern is charity.
— Alexander Pope
In Faith and Hope the world will disagree,
But all mankind's concern is charity.

charity

All seems infected that the infected spy
As all looks yellow to a jaundiced eye.

eyes

The ruling passion, be it what it will. The ruling passion conquers reason still.
— Alexander Pope

passion

The ruling passion, be it what it will, the ruling passion conquers reason still.
— Alexander Pope
Tis education forms the common mind; just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined.
— Alexander Pope

education

All are but parts of one stupendous whole, whose body Nature is, and God the soul.
— Alexander Pope
For critics, as they are birds of prey, have ever a natural inclination to carrion.
— Alexander Pope

critics

Unblemished let me live or die unknown; Oh, grant an honest fame, or grant me none!
— Alexander Pope
Is that a birthday? 'tis, alas! too clear;

'Tis but the funeral of the former year.
— Alexander Pope

birthday

'Tis education forms the common mind,
Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined.

education

A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
— Alexander Pope
How index-learning turns no student pale, 
Yet holds the eel of science by the tail!
— Alexander Pope

science

To wake the soul by tender strokes of art, to raise the genius, and to mend of heart.
— Alexander Pope
To whom can riches give repute, or trust, content, or pleasure, but the good and just?
— Alexander Pope
Nature and Nature's laws lay hid in night:
God said, "Let Newton be" and all was light.
— Alexander Pope
A brave man struggling in the storms of fate, and greatly falling with a falling state.
— Alexander Pope
It is not strength, but art, obtains the prize. And to be swift is less than to be wise.
— Alexander Pope
There is no study that is not capable of delighting us after a little application to it.
— Alexander Pope
Nor fame I slight, nor for her favors call; she comes unlooked for, if she comes at all.
— Alexander Pope
Love, free as air at sight of human ties, spreads its light wings, and in a moment flies.
— Alexander Pope
Years following years steal something every day;
At last they steal us from ourselves away.

years

'Tis with our judgments as our watches; none go just alike, yet each believes his own watch.
— Alexander Pope
Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll;
Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.

beauty charm merit

Words are like leaves; and where they most abound,
Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.

brevity words

Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
— Alexander Pope
True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, as those move easiest who have learned to dance.
— Alexander Pope
True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,
As those move easiest who have learned to dance.

writing

I never knew any man in my life who could not bear another's misfortune perfectly like a Christian.

misfortune

Some people will never learn anything, for this reason, because they understand everything too soon.
— Alexander Pope

learning understanding

What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better than tedious disease.
— Alexander Pope

dieting health

Teach me to feel another's woe,
To hide the fault I see;
That mercy I to others show,
That mercy show to me.
— Alexander Pope

mercy

What is it to be wise? 'Tis but to know how little can be known — to see all other's faults and feel our own.
— Alexander Pope
Music resembles poetry; in each
Are nameless graces which no methods teach,
And which a master-hand alone can reach.

music

It is very natural for a young friend and a young lover to think the persons they love have nothing to do but to please them.
— Alexander Pope
It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow-necked bottles; the less they have in it, the more noise they make in pouring it out.
— Alexander Pope

charity

"Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" was the ninth beatitude which a man of wit...added to the eighth.
— Alexander Pope

expectation

Old men, for the most part, are like old chronicles that give you dull but true accounts of times past, and are worth knowing only on that score.

old age

A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday.

apology

A man should never be ashamed to own that he had been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday.
— Alexander Pope
Wit in conversation is only a readiness of thought and a facility of expression, or (in the midwives' phrase) a quick conception, and an easy delivery.

conversation wit

Vice is a monster of so frightful mien
As to be hated, needs but to be seen;
But seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

vice

One Simile, that solitary shines
In the dry desert of a thousand lines,
Or lengthen'd Thought that gleams through many a page,
Has sanctify'd whole poems for an age.
— Alexander Pope

simile

Praise is like ambergris; a little whiff of it, and by snatches, is very agreeable; but when a man holds a whole lump of it to your nose, it is a stink, and strikes you down.

praise

Of all the causes which conspire to blind
Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind,
What the weak head with strongest bias rules
Is Pride, the never-failing vice of fools.

pride