Satire Quotes

Most popular satire quotes

Satire is tragedy plus time.
Satire is focused bitterness.
It is hard not to write satire.
Satire is what closes on Saturday night.
Satire is exaggeration and distortion to make a point.
Satire is a wrapping of exaggeration around a core of reality.
Satire is dependent on strong beliefs, and on strong beliefs wounded.
Satire's my weapon, but I'm too discreet
To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet.
A man is angry at a libel because it is false, but at a satire because it is true.
Prepare for rhyme—I'll publish right or wrong:
Fools are my theme, let Satire be my song.
Satire should, like a polish'd razor keen,
Wound with a touch, that's scarcely felt or seen.
Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own.
Criticizing a political satirist for being unfair is like criticizing a 260-pound noseguard for being physical.

politics

A satirist is a man profoundly revolted by the society in which he lives. His rage takes the form of wit, ridicule, mockery.
A satirist, often in danger himself, has the bravery of knowing that to withhold wit's conjecture is to endanger the species.
By rights, satire is a lonely and introspective occupation, for nobody can describe a fool to the life without much patient self-inspection.
Satire's nature is to be one-sided, contemptuous of ambiguity, and so unfairly selective as to find in the purity of ridicule an inarguable moral truth.
The difference between satire and humor is that the satirist shoots to kill while the humorist brings his prey back alive—often to release him again for another chance.

humor

Satire is traditionally the weapon of the powerless against the powerful. I only aim at the powerful. When satire is aimed at the powerless, it is not only cruel—it's vulgar.
Satire may be of a dozen kinds and used for a dozen purposes.  It may be personal, malicious, diabolical, and colorless, just a stick to beat a dog.  But humor is the very life of it.
A satirist is a man whose flesh creeps so at the ugly and the savage and the incongruous aspects of society that he has to express them as brutally and nakedly as possible to get relief.
The satirist who writes nothing but satire should write but little—or it will seem that his satire springs rather from his own caustic nature than from the sins of the world in which he lives.
There is parody, when you make fun of people who are smarter than you; satire, when you make fun of people who are richer than you; and burlesque, when you make fun of both while taking your clothes off.

parody

In modern America, anyone who attempts to write satirically about the events of the day finds it difficult to concoct a situation so bizarre that it may not actually come to pass while his article is still on the presses.
The moment you say that any idea system is sacred, whether it's a religious belief system or a secular ideology, the moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible.
Religious totalitarianism has caused a deadly mutation in the heart of Islam and we see the tragic consequences in Paris today.  I stand with Charlie Hebdo, as we all must, to defend the art of satire, which has always been a force for liberty and against tyranny, dishonesty and stupidity.
A satirist is a man whose flesh creeps so at the ugly and the savage and the incongruous aspects of society that he has to express them as brutally and nakedly as possible to get relief.  He seeks to put his grisly obsession into expressive form the way a bacteriologist seeks to isolate a virus.