Aristotle Quotes

Most popular Aristotle Quotes

We are what we repeatedly do.
— Aristotle

action habit

Hope is a waking dream.
— Aristotle (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)

hope

Beauty is a gift of god.
— Aristotle
Wit is educated insolence.
— Aristotle (Rhetoric)

wit

Nature does nothing uselessly.
— Aristotle

nature

What soon grows old?  Gratitude.
— Aristotle (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)

gratitude

Law is reason free from passion.
— Aristotle
The actuality of thought is life.
— Aristotle
Happiness depends upon ourselves.
— Aristotle
Hope is the dream of a waking man.
— Aristotle

hope

Moral virtue is the child of habit.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

virtue

All men by nature desire knowledge.
— Aristotle
The end of labor is to gain leisure.
— Aristotle
Man is by nature a political animal.
— Aristotle (Politics)

mankind man the animal politics

A man is the original of his actions.
— Aristotle
Quality is not an act, it is a habit.
— Aristotle

quality

We make war that we may live in peace.
— Aristotle

peace war

Wonder is the first cause of philosophy.
— Aristotle
The soul never thinks without a picture.
— Aristotle
Law is order, and good law is good order.
— Aristotle

law

All virtue is summed up in dealing justly.
— Aristotle
All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.
— Aristotle
What is justice? To give every man his due.
— Aristotle
Melancholy men of all others are most witty.
— Aristotle
Education is the best provision for old age.
— Aristotle
Our characters are the result of our conduct.
— Aristotle
Friendship is one soul abiding in two bodies.
— Aristotle
Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.
— Aristotle (Politics)

poverty

What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing.
— Aristotle

experience

Wicked men obey from fear; good men, from love.
— Aristotle
It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.
— Aristotle

quotations

All we do is done with an eye to something else.
— Aristotle

motives

To run away from trouble is a form of cowardice.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

trouble

Philosophy is the science which considers truth.
— Aristotle
It would be wrong to put friendship before truth.
— Aristotle
Liars when they speak the truth are not believed.
— Aristotle (Lives of Eminent Philosophers)

lying

Misfortune shows those who are not really friends.
— Aristotle
No great genius has ever been without some madness.
— Aristotle
Friendship is a single soul dwelling in two bodies.
— Aristotle

friendship

In the naming of things one must go with the crowd.
— Aristotle

language

Consider pleasures as they depart, not as they come.
— Aristotle
Youth is easily deceived because it is quick to hope.
— Aristotle

hope youth

All that we do is done with an eye to something else.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

motives

There is no great genius without a mixture of madness.
— Aristotle

genius

When Pleasure is at the bar the jury is not impartial.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

pleasure

There was never a genius without a tincture of madness.
— Aristotle

genius insanity

What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.
— Aristotle

friendship

Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.
— Aristotle

love

Of man in general, the parts are greater than the whole.
— Aristotle
There is a foolish corner in the brain of the wisest man.
— Aristotle

wisdom

The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.
— Aristotle (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)

education

Happiness seems to require a modicum of external prosperity.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

prosperity

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.
— Aristotle
Of mankind in general, the parts are greater than the whole.
— Aristotle

mankind

The young are permanently in a state resembling intoxication.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

youth

What lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do.
— Aristotle
All art, all education, can be merely a supplement to nature.
— Aristotle
No great genius has ever existed without some touch of madness.
— Aristotle (Sententiae)

genius insanity

The good man thinks it is more blessed to give than to receive.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

Giving

Those who have never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.
— Aristotle
What it lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do.
— Aristotle

power

Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.
— Aristotle

education

Democracy is the form of government in which the free are rulers.
— Aristotle (Politics)

democracy

Those who wish to succeed must ask the right preliminary questions.
— Aristotle (Metaphysics)

asking questions success

Everyone thinks chiefly of his own, hardly ever of public interest.
— Aristotle

self-interest

Whosoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god.
— Aristotle

solitude

My best friend is one who is wishing me well wishes, it for my sake.
— Aristotle
Good laws, if they are not obeyed, do not constitute good government.
— Aristotle (Politics)

law

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.
— Aristotle

dignity proverbs

The virtue of justice consists in moderation, as regulated by wisdom.
— Aristotle

justice

The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.
— Aristotle

knowledge

Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.
— Aristotle
The one exclusive sign of a thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.
— Aristotle
Whereas the law is passionless, passion must ever sway the heart of man.
— Aristotle (Politics)

law passion

Whereas the law is passionless, passion must ever sway the hearts of men.
— Aristotle
Personal beauty is a greater recommendation than any letter of reference.
— Aristotle (Lives of the Philosophers)

beauty

Men acquire a particular quality by constantly acting in a particular way.
— Aristotle
Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.
— Aristotle
A likely impossibility is always preferable to an unconvincing possibility.
— Aristotle
It is best to rise from life as from a banquet, neither thirsty nor drunken.
— Aristotle
Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow-ripening fruit.
— Aristotle (Nichomachean Ethics)

friendship

We should behave to our friends as we would wish our friends to behave to us.
— Aristotle (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)

golden rules

Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.
— Aristotle

friendship

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.
— Aristotle
Patience is so like fortitude that she seems either her sister or her daughter.
— Aristotle
If things do not turn out as we wish, we should wish for them as they turn out.
— Aristotle
The state exists for the sake of a good life, and not for the sake of life only.
— Aristotle
That which is common to the greatest number has the least care bestowed upon it.
— Aristotle
In educating the young we use pleasure and pain as rudders to steer their course.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

pleasure and pain

Even when laws have been written down, they ought not always to remain unaltered.
— Aristotle
Dignity and nobility does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.
— Aristotle
To learn is a natural pleasure, not confined to philosophers, but common to all men.
— Aristotle (Poetics)

learning

The young are in a state like intoxication, for youth is sweet and they are growing.
— Aristotle

youth

Happiness is the meaning and purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence.
— Aristotle
To be acceptable as scientific knowledge a truth must be a deduction from other truths.
— Aristotle

science

To the query, "What is a friend?" his reply was, "A single soul dwelling in two bodies."
— Aristotle (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)

friendship

With regard to excellence, it is not enough to know, but we must try to have and use it.
— Aristotle
Virtue is a mean state between two vices, the one of excess and the other of deficiency.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

virtue

We are better able to study our neighbors than ourselves, and their actions than our own.
— Aristotle
Some men are just as sure of the truth of their opinions as are others of what they know.
— Aristotle
Learning is an ornament in prosperity, a refuge in adversity, and a provision in old age.
— Aristotle
Poetry is something more philosophical and more worthy of serious attention than history.
— Aristotle
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
— Aristotle

education ideas

We will more easily accomplish what is proper if, like archers, we have a target in sight.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

accomplishment

The family is the association established by nature for the supply of man's everyday wants.
— Aristotle (Politics)

family

The family is the association established by nature for the supply of a man's everyday wants.
— Aristotle
How many a dispute could have been deflated if the disputants had dared to define their terms.
— Aristotle

arguments definitions

The life of children, as much as that of intemperate men, is wholly governed by their desires.
— Aristotle
At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.
— Aristotle

law

At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separate from law and justice, he is the worst.
— Aristotle

law

The unfortunate need people who will be kind to them; the prosperous need people to be kind to.
— Aristotle
Good has two meanings: it means that which is good absolutely and that which is good for somebody.
— Aristotle
The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things but their inward significance.
— Aristotle

art

At his best, man is the noblest of all the animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.
— Aristotle
The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.
— Aristotle

art

No man would choose a friendless existence on condition of having all the other things in the world.
— Aristotle
The young are permanently in a state resembling intoxication; for youth is sweet and they are growing.
— Aristotle
The Good of man is the active exercise of his soul's faculties in conformity with excellence or virtue.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

excellence

In the area of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.
— Aristotle
In the arena of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

action

Democracy arose from people who thought that if they are equal in any respect, they are equal absolutely.
— Aristotle
A man with a host of friends who slaps on the back every man he meets is regarded as the friend of nobody.
— Aristotle
Man is a goal seeking animal. Our life only has meaning if we are reaching out and striving for our goals.
— Aristotle
A king ruleth as he ought; a tyrant as the lest; a king to the profit of all, a tyrant only to please a few.
— Aristotle
The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.
— Aristotle

awareness thinking

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness, and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.
— Aristotle
The difference between an educated and uneducated man is the same difference as between being alive and being dead.
— Aristotle
If, in a word, it be in our power to do what is noble and what is disgraceful, it is equally in our power not to do it.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

self-control

It is not ill-bred to adopt a high manner with the great and the powerful, but it is vulgar to lord it over humble people.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

manners

Every action must be due to one or other of seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reasoning, anger, or appetite.
— Aristotle
I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is the victory over self.
— Aristotle (Florilegium)

bravery desire self-control the self

For as bats' eyes are to daylight so is our intellectual eye to those truths which are, in their own nature, the most obvious of all.
— Aristotle (Metaphysics)

truth

If happiness is activity in accordance with excellence, it is reasonable that it should be in accordance with the highest excellence.
— Aristotle (Nichomachean Ethics)

excellence happiness

All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends upon the education of youth.
— Aristotle
Politicians also have no leisure, because they are always aiming at something beyond political life itself, power and glory, or happiness.
— Aristotle

politicians

Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.
— Aristotle

revolt revolution

Quite often good things have hurtful consequences. There are instances of men who have been ruined by their money or killed by their courage.
— Aristotle
Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior.  Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.
— Aristotle (Politics)

revolution

One swallow does not make a summer, neither does one fine day; similarly, one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy.
— Aristotle (Nichomachean Ethics)

happiness

Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit. We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.
— Aristotle

morals

It concerns us to know the purposes we seek in life, for then, like archers aiming at a definite mark, we shall be more likely to attain what we want.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

goals purpose of life

It really lies in this: the one describes what has happened, the other what might. Hence poetry speaks of what is universal, history of what is particular.
— Aristotle
If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in government to the utmost.
— Aristotle

democracy equality

This is the reason why mothers are more devoted to their children than fathers: it is that they suffer more in giving them birth and are more certain that they are their own.
— Aristotle
Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.
— Aristotle
Anyone can become angry. That is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose and in the right way — that is not easy.
— Aristotle

anger

The beauty of the soul shines out when a man bears with composure one heavy mischance after another, not because he does not feel them, but because he is a man of high and heroic temper.
— Aristotle
Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and choice, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim.
— Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics)

Goodness

A sense is what has the power of receiving into itself the sensible forms of things without the matter, in the way in which a piece of wax takes on the impress of a signet-ring without the iron or gold.
— Aristotle
First, have a definite, clear practical ideal; a goal, an objective. Second, have the necessary means to achieve your ends; wisdom, money, materials, and methods. Third, adjust all your means to that end.
— Aristotle
Anybody can become angry - that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way - that is not within everybody's power and is not easy.
— Aristotle

anger priorities

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor.  It is the one thing that cannot be learned from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in dissimilars.
— Aristotle (Poetics)

metaphor

Happiness, whether consisting in pleasure or excellence, or both, is more often found with those who are most highly cultivated in their mind and in their character, and have only a moderate share of external goods, than among those who possess external goods to a useless extent but are deficient in higher qualities.
— Aristotle (Politics)

happiness