Jane Austen Quotes

Most popular Jane Austen Quotes

An artist cannot do anything slovenly.
— Jane Austen

artists

Those who do not complain are never pitied.

complaining

Everything nourishes what is strong already.

Strength

A woman never looks better than on horseback.

horses

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.
— Jane Austen

marriage

Vanity working on a weak head produces every sort of mischief.
— Jane Austen Emma

vanity

A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.

happiness

One half the world can not understand the pleasures of the other.
— Jane Austen
When pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.

pleasure and pain

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.
— Jane Austen Emma

pleasure understanding others

There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends.
— Jane Austen
One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.
— Jane Austen
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
— Jane Austen
I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle.

selfishness

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.
— Jane Austen

women

Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
— Jane Austen

selfishness

Selfishness must always be forgiven, you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

selfishness

Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.

pride vanity

It is very unfair to judge of any body's conduct without an intimate knowledge of their situation.
— Jane Austen Emma

judging

Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

opposition

In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes.

excellence

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.
— Jane Austen

imagination

A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
— Jane Austen

women

Why not seize the pleasure at once?  How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!
— Jane Austen Emma

preparation

It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.
— Jane Austen

marriage

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

famous

Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what the difficulties of any individual of that family may be.
— Jane Austen Emma

family

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

humility

If one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.

happiness comfort

Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply.

siblings

There is not the least wit in my nature. I am a very matter-of-fact, plain-spoken being, and may blunder on the borders of a repartee for half-an-hour together without striking it out.
There seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labor of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them.

novelists

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity to what we would have others think of us.

pride vanity

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
— Jane Austen

vanity pride

There is not one in a hundred of either sex who is not taken in when they marry.  Look where I will, I see that it is so; and I feel that it must be so, when I consider that it is, of all transactions, the one in which people expect most from others, and are least honest themselves.

marriage