Theodore Roosevelt Quotes

Most popular Theodore Roosevelt Quotes

Don't spread patriotism too thin.
— Theodore Roosevelt
The light has gone out of my life.

sorrow

Don't foul, don't flinch—hit the line hard.
— Theodore Roosevelt

diligence

Don't flinch, don't foul, hit the line hard!
— Theodore Roosevelt
Nine-tenths of wisdom is being wise in time.
— Theodore Roosevelt

wisdom

Believe you can and you're the halfway there.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.
— Theodore Roosevelt

how to live life

Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Nine-tenths of wisdom consists in being wise in time.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Obedience of the law is demanded; not asked as a favor.
— Theodore Roosevelt
We must treat each man on his worth and merits as a man.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.
— Theodore Roosevelt
I do not in the least object to a sport because it is rough.
— Theodore Roosevelt

sports

No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expedience.
— Theodore Roosevelt

morals

Aggressive fighting for the right is the greatest sport in the world.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Order without liberty and liberty without order are equally destructive.
— Theodore Roosevelt

freedom order

Get action. Seize the moment. Man was never intended to become an oyster.
— Theodore Roosevelt
In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: hit the line hard.

hard work life how to live life

Perhaps there is no more important component of character than steadfast resolution.

character

A great democracy must be progressive or it will soon cease to be a great democracy.
— Theodore Roosevelt

democracy

The noblest of all forms of government is self-government, but it is the most difficult.
— Theodore Roosevelt
I think there is only one quality worse than hardness of heart and that is softness of head.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
— Theodore Roosevelt

work

Instruction in things moral is most necessary to the making of the highest type of citizenship.
— Theodore Roosevelt
I think that there is only one quality worse than hardness of heart and that is softness of head.
— Theodore Roosevelt

head and heart

Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
— Theodore Roosevelt

work

The most important single ingredient in the formula of success is knowing how to get along with people.
— Theodore Roosevelt

dealing with people success

A President has a great chance; his position is almost that of a king and a prime minister rolled into one.

president

The most successful politician is he who says what the people are thinking most often in the loudest voice.
— Theodore Roosevelt

politicians

When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer "Present" or "Not guilty."
— Theodore Roosevelt

politicians

I entirely appreciate loyalty to one's friends, but loyalty to the cause of justice and honor stands above it.

loyalty

No man is above the law and no man is below it: nor do we ask any man's permission when we ask him to obey it.
— Theodore Roosevelt
Every right-minded man utterly despises a coward in private life.  Cowardice is the unpardonable sin in a man.

cowardice

This country will not be a good place for any of us to live in unless we make it a good place for all of us to live in.
— Theodore Roosevelt

America

A man who has never gone to school may steal a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.
— Theodore Roosevelt

education

No man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his body, to risk his well-being, to risk his life, in a great cause.

risk-taking

No man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his well-being, to risk his body, to risk his life, in a great cause.
— Theodore Roosevelt
In short, in life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don't foul and don't shirk, but hit the line hard!
— Theodore Roosevelt

football

The life of duty, not the life of mere ease or mere pleasure; that is the kind of life which makes the great man, as it makes the great nation.
— Theodore Roosevelt
People ask the difference between a leader and a boss ... The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives.
— Theodore Roosevelt

leadership

In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.
— Theodore Roosevelt
It is far more important that they should conduct their business affairs decently than that they should spend the surplus of their fortunes in philanthropy.
— Theodore Roosevelt
The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it.
— Theodore Roosevelt

leadership management

The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.
— Theodore Roosevelt
For us is the life of action, of strenuous performance of duty; let us live in the harness, striving mightily; let us rather run the risk of wearing out than rusting out.
— Theodore Roosevelt

striving action

There is no moral difference between gambling at cards or in lotteries or on the race track and gambling in the stock market.  One method is just as pernicious to the body politic as the other kind.
— Theodore Roosevelt

gambling

Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.

victory & defeat risk-taking striving

Any man who tries to excite class hatred, sectional hate, hate of creeds, any kind of hatred in our community, though he may affect to do it in the interest of the class he is addressing, is in the long run with absolute certainty that class's own worst enemy.
— Theodore Roosevelt

hate

To waste, to destroy our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result in undermining in the days of our children the very prosperity which we ought, by right, to hand down to them amplified and developed.
— Theodore Roosevelt

environment natural resources

Perhaps there is no more important component of character than steadfast resolution.  The boy who is going to make a great man, or is going to count in any way in after life, must make up his mind not merely to overcome a thousand obstacles, but to win in spite of a thousand repulses or defeats.

obstacles

To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public.  Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.

president

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly....
— Theodore Roosevelt
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause.
— Theodore Roosevelt

cause

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.
— Theodore Roosevelt

victory & defeat risk-taking striving