Lord Chesterfield Quotes

Most popular Lord Chesterfield Quotes

Style is the dress of thoughts.
— Lord Chesterfield
Dispatch is the soul of business.
— Lord Chesterfield

business

Cunning is the dark sanctuary of incapacity.
Honest error is to be pitied, not ridiculed.
— Lord Chesterfield

error

Few people do business well who do nothing else.
— Lord Chesterfield

priorities work

If a thing's worth doing, it's worth doing well.
— Lord Chesterfield
Character must be kept bright, as well as clean.
— Lord Chesterfield
An injury is much sooner forgotten than an insult.
— Lord Chesterfield

insults

Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
— Lord Chesterfield
Modesty is the only sure bait when you angle for praise.
— Lord Chesterfield

praise modesty

To please people is a great step toward persuading them.
— Lord Chesterfield

persuasion

The less one has to do, the less time one finds to do it in.
— Lord Chesterfield

time

Style is the dress of thoughts; and let them be ever so just.
— Lord Chesterfield

style

Manners must adorn knowledge, and smooth its way in the world.
— Lord Chesterfield

manners

Advice is seldom welcome. Those who need it most, like it least.
— Lord Chesterfield
Without some dissimulation no business can be carried on at all.
— Lord Chesterfield

business

Human nature is the same everywhere; the modes only are different.

human nature

He who has the most friends and the fewest enemies is the strongest.
— Lord Chesterfield

Strength

Never seem wiser, nor more well learned than the people you are with.
— Lord Chesterfield
Do as you would be done by is the surest method that I know of pleasing.
— Lord Chesterfield

golden rules

Whoever is in a hurry, shows that the thing he is about is too big for him.
— Lord Chesterfield

time

Speak of the moderns without contempt, and of the ancients without idolatry.
— Lord Chesterfield
There never were, since the creation of the world, two cases exactly parallel.
— Lord Chesterfield
A man who cannot command his temper should not think of being a man of business.
— Lord Chesterfield
Advice is seldom welcome; and those who want it the most always like it the least.
— Lord Chesterfield

advice

Either a good or a bad reputation outruns and gels before people wherever they go.
— Lord Chesterfield

reputation

Merit and knowledge will not gain hearts, though they will secure them when gained.
— Lord Chesterfield

merit

A joker is near akin to a buffoon; and neither of them is the least related to wit.
— Lord Chesterfield
The knowledge of the world is only to be acquired in the world, and not in a closet.
— Lord Chesterfield

knowledge experience

Men, as well as women, are much oftener led by their hearts than by their understandings.
— Lord Chesterfield
Pocket all your knowledge with your watch, and never pull it out in company unless desired.
— Lord Chesterfield

modesty

I wish to God that you had as much pleasure in following my advice, as I have in giving it to you.
— Lord Chesterfield

advice

Men are much more unwilling to have their weaknesses and their imperfections known than their crimes.
— Lord Chesterfield

weakness

Distrust all those who love you extremely upon a very slight acquaintance, and without any visible reason.
— Lord Chesterfield

trust

Young men are as apt to think themselves wise enough, as drunken men are to think themselves sober enough.
— Lord Chesterfield
Young men are apt to think themselves wise enough, as drunken men are apt to think themselves sober enough.
— Lord Chesterfield

youth

The heart has such an influence over the understanding that it is worth while to engage it in our interest.
— Lord Chesterfield

head and heart

When you have found the master passion of a man, remember never to trust to him where that passion is concerned.
— Lord Chesterfield
Most arts require long study and application, but the most useful of all, that of pleasing, requires only the desire.
— Lord Chesterfield
True politeness is perfect ease and freedom. It simply consists in treating others just as you love to be treated yourself.
— Lord Chesterfield
I look upon indolence as a sort of suicide; for the man is effectually destroyed, though the appetite of the brute may survive.
— Lord Chesterfield
Women have, in general, but one object, which is their beauty; upon which, scarce any flattery is too gross for them to swallow.
— Lord Chesterfield

flattery

Wear your learning, like your watch, in a private pocket: and do not pull it out and strike it, merely to show that you have one.
— Lord Chesterfield
Wear your learning, like your watch, in a private pocket; and do not merely pull it out, and strike it, merely to show you have one.
— Lord Chesterfield

learning

Wit is so shining a quality that everybody admires it; most people aim at it, all people fear it, and few love it unless in themselves.
— Lord Chesterfield
Wit is so shining a quality that everybody admires it, most people aim at it, and all people fear it. Few love it unless in themselves.
— Lord Chesterfield

humor

In matters of religion and matrimony I never give any advice; because I will not have anybody's torments in this world or the next laid to my charge.
— Lord Chesterfield

advice

Manners must adorn knowledge and smooth its way through the world. A man's own good breeding is the best security against other people's ill manners.
— Lord Chesterfield
Knowledge is a comfortable and necessary retreat and shelter for us in advanced age.  If we do not plant it while young, it will give us no shade when we grow old.
— Lord Chesterfield

knowledge

As for operas, they are essentially too absurd and extravagant to mention; I look upon them as a magic scene, contrived to please the eyes and the ears at the expense of the understanding.
— Lord Chesterfield

opera

Learning is acquired by reading books: but the much more necessary learning, the knowledge of the world, is only to be acquired by reading men, and studying all the various editions of them.
— Lord Chesterfield

learning

A strong mind sees things in their true proportions; a weak one views them through a magnifying medium; which, like the microscope, makes an elephant of a flea; magnifies all little objects, but cannot receive great ones.
— Lord Chesterfield

mind

Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable; however, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer it, than those whose laziness and despondency makes them give it up as unattainable.
— Lord Chesterfield

perfection

Manners must adorn knowledge, and smooth its way through the world. Like a great rough diamond, it may do very well in a closet by way of curiosity, and also for its intrinsic value; but it will never be worn, nor shine, if it is not polished.
— Lord Chesterfield

knowledge

If ever a man and his wife, or a man and his mistress, who pass nights as well as days together, absolutely lay aside all good breeding, their intimacy will soon degenerate into a coarse familiarity, infallibly productive of contempt or disgust.
— Lord Chesterfield

familiarity