Jean-Jacques Rousseau Quotes

Most popular Jean-Jacques Rousseau Quotes

Money is the seed of money.

money

Childhood is the sleep of reason.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Reason deceives us; conscience, never.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

reason conscience

An honest man nearly always thinks justly.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet!

patience

Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

patience

We do not know what is really good or bad fortune.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

misfortune fortune

No man has any natural authority over his fellow men.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

kindness wisdom

A man's pleasures are in the happiness of a man's family.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The mind grows narrow in proportion as the soul grows corrupt.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The universe was born restless and has never since been still.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Conscience is the voice of the soul; the passions of the body.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Nature never deceives us; it is always we who deceive ourselves.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Happiness: a good bank account, a good cook, and a good digestion.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

happiness

Liberty is obedience to the law which one has laid down for oneself.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

freedom

The man who is slowest in promising is most likely to keep his word.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

promises

The thirst after happiness is never extinguished in the heart of man.

happiness

Accent is the soul of language; it gives to it both feeling and truth.
Youth is the time to study wisdom; old age is the time to practice it.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Fear and hope are the two great instruments for the governance of men.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

government

Whoever blushes is already guilty; true innocence is ashamed of nothing.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

embarrassment

Good laws lead to the making of better ones; bad ones bring about worse.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
A country cannot subsist well without liberty, nor liberty without virtue.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
He who is slowest in making a promise is most faithful in its performance.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

promises

I have always said and felt that true enjoyment cannot be expressed in words.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
You forget that the fruits belong to all and that the land belongs to no one.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

socialism environment

The right of conquest has no foundation other than the right of the strongest.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

war

He who is most slow in making a promise is the most faithful in performance of it.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

commitment

A man who is most slow in making a promise is the most faithful in its performance.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Virtue is a state of war, and to live in it we have always to combat with ourselves.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Brains well prepared are the monuments where human knowledge is most surely engraved.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
People who know little are usually great talkers, while people who know much say little.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Gratitude is indeed a duty which we are bound to pay, but which benefactors cannot exact.

gratitude

Laws are always useful to those who have possessions, and harmful to those who have nothing.

law

It is not the criminal things which are hardest to confess, but the ridiculous and shameful.
Nothing is less in our power than the heart, and far from commanding we are forced to obey it.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
That man is truly free who only wishes what he is able to accomplish and does what pleases him.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The happiest is he who suffers the least pain ; the most miserable, he who enjoys the least pleasure.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

happiness

The happiest is one who suffers the least pain; the most miserable, one who enjoys the least pleasure.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
I propose to show my fellow-mortals a man in all the integrity of nature; and this man shall be myself.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Everything is good as it leaves the hands of the Author of things; everything degenerates in the hands of man.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau

nature

Money is the seed of money and the first guinea is sometimes more difficult to acquire than the second million.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Temperance and industry are man's true remedies; work sharpens his appetite and temperance teaches him to control it.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Conscience is the voice of the soul, as the passions are the voice of the body. No wonder they often contradict each other.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
If there is anything to reform in public morals, one must begin with domestic morals, and they depend entirely on the fathers and mothers.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Provided a man is not mad, he can be cured of every folly but vanity; there is no cure for this but experience, if indeed there is any cure for it at all.

vanity

The first man to fence in a piece of land, saying "This is mine," and who found people simple enough to believe him, was the real founder of civil society.

property rights

Everything made by man may be destroyed by man; there are no ineffaceable characters except those engraved by nature; and nature makes neither kings nor rich men.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Perhaps adversity is a great teacher, but he charges a high price for his lessons, and often the profit we take from them is not worth the price they have cost us.

adversity

As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall.
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Men, be kind to your fellow-men; this is your first duty, kind to every age and station, kind to all that is not foreign to humanity.  What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?

kindness

Astronomy was born of superstition; eloquence of ambition, hatred, falsehood, and flattery; geometry of avarice; physics of an idle curiosity; and even moral philosophy of human pride.  Thus the arts and sciences owe their birth to our vices.

vice