Reviews Quotes

Most popular reviews quotes

A bad review by a man I admire hurts terribly.
One cannot review a bad book without showing off.

critics

I never read a book before reviewing it; it prejudices a man so.
Receiving a bad review is like being spat on by a complete stranger in Times Square.
A bad review may spoil your breakfast but you shouldn't allow it to spoil your lunch.
A bad review is like baking a cake with all the best ingredients and having someone sit on it.
A book review is a scene of judgment, with one body in the judge's chair, the other in the defendant's.
Nature fits all her children with something to do,
He who would write and can't write can surely review.

critics

Book reviews should persuade, inform, and, above all, entertain readers.  And nothing is as entertaining as the well-turned barb.
Adverse book reviews there have always been, and always should be, lest a tide of good intentions rise to drown us all in worthy sludge.
I subscribe to the theory that a good review makes you feel good for seven minutes, and a bad review makes you feel miserable for seven years.
Reviewers are usually people who would have been poets, biographers...if they could; they have tried their talents at one or the other, and have failed; therefore they turn to critics.

critics

I have long felt that any reviewer who expresses rage and loathing for a novel or a play or a poem is preposterous. He or she is like a person who has put on full armor and attacked a hot fudge sundae or banana split.

critics

Book reviewing in America is a hybrid occupation.  Part trade and part profession, part art and part craft, part literature and part journalism, it lies somewhere between the outskirts of the work and the fringes of the world of letters.

critics

Every good reviewer has a subject.  He specializes in that subject on which he has not been able to write a book, and his aim is to see that no one else does.  He stands behind the ticket-queue of fame, banging his rivals on the head as they bend low before the guichet.

critics

Authors of some rhetorical sophistication know that a reviewer has an obligation that goes beyond deposing accurately and justly on the contents and value of the book in hand: he has an obligation to be interesting, which means, variously, funny, dramatic, significant, outraged, or winning.
Whether written by fellow writers or professional reviewers, the all-out assault is what every writer dreads.  I have heard it described in various ways—snide, dismissive, insulting.  Let us call it, for the sake of hyperbole, the ground-zero review.  In it, the writer is often urged to seek another line of work.