Free Will Quotes

Most popular free will quotes

Life is a compromise between fate and free will.

life

Man is fully responsible for his nature and his choices.
If a thing is free to be good it is also free to be bad. And free will is what has made evil possible.

good and evil

Life is like a game of cards. The hand you are dealt is determinism; the way you play it is free will.

fate life

Man is condemned to be free; because once thrown into the world, he is responsible for everything he does.
Because free will, though it makes evil possible, is also the only thing that makes possible any love or goodness or joy worth having.
Man is a being with free will; therefore, each man is potentially good or evil, and it's up to him and only him (through his reasoning mind) to decide which he wants to be.
The will is never free—it is always attached to an object, a purpose. It is simply the engine in the car—it can't steer.  It is the mind, the reason, the imagination that steers.
Even though neuroscience shows us that there is no such thing as free will, in practical terms it made sense because nobody could understand and manipulate your innermost feelings.
If my mental processes are determined wholly by the motions of atoms in my brain, I have no reason to suppose that my beliefs are true ... and hence I have no reason for supposing my brain to be composed of atoms.

consciousness

The more people believe in free will, that their feelings represent some mystical spiritual capacity, the easier it is to manipulate them, because they won't think that their feelings are being produced and manipulated by some external system.

artificial intelligence

Thus no thoroughgoing Naturalist believes in free will: for free will would mean that human beings have the power of independent action, the power of doing something more or other than what was involved by the total series of events. And any such separate power of originating events is what the Naturalist denies. Spontaneity, originality, action 'on its own', is a privilege reserved for 'the whole show', which he calls Nature.