John Locke Quotes

Most popular John Locke Quotes

Wherever law ends, tyranny begins.

law

The highest probability amounts not to certainty.

certainty

Where there is no desire, there will be no industry.
— John Locke
No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience.
— John Locke
Curiosity in children is but an appetite for knowledge.
— John Locke
Curiosity in children ... is but an appetite after knowledge.

curiosity

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

knowledge

The actions of men are the best interpreters of their thoughts.
— John Locke
Habits work more constantly and with greater force than reason.
— John Locke
Fashion is, for the most part, nothing but the ostentation of riches.
— John Locke
Truth, like gold, is not less so for being newly brought out of the mine.

truth

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

action

The end of law is, not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom.

law

Where all is but dream, reasoning and arguments are of no use, truth and knowledge nothing.
— John Locke
Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain.
— John Locke

parenting

It is one thing to show a man that he is in error, and another to put him in possession of truth.

error education

Should parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain?
— John Locke
It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.

mistakes truth

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.
— John Locke

critical thinking thinking reading

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge it is thinking [that] makes what we read ours.

thinking

Crooked things may be as stiff and unflexible as straight: and men may be as positive in error as in truth.

error

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.

error

The thoughts that come often unsought, and, as it were, drop into the mind, are commonly the most valuable of any we have.
— John Locke

thoughts

All mankind ... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions.
— John Locke

equality

The improvement of understanding is for two ends: first, our own increase of knowledge; secondly, to enable us to deliver that knowledge to others.
— John Locke

understanding

We would have a great fewer disputes in the world if words were taken for what they are, the signs of our ideas only, and not for things themselves.
— John Locke
The improvement of the understanding is for two ends; first, our own increase of knowledge; secondly, to enable us to deliver that knowledge to others.
— John Locke
As there is a partiality to opinions, which is apt to mislead the understanding, so there is also a partiality to studies, which is prejudicial to knowledge.
— John Locke
When ideas float in our mind, without any reflection or regard of the understanding, it is that which the French call reverie; our language has scarce a name for it.
A taste of every sort of knowledge is necessary to form the mind, and is the only way to give the understanding its due improvement to the full extent of its capacity.
— John Locke
A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this World: he that has these two has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them will be little the better for anything else.

health happiness