Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes

Most popular Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes

Life is made up of marble and mud.

life

A gush of violets along a wood path.

flowers

Mountains are earth's undecaying monuments.
Mankind is earthen jugs with spirits in them.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
What is the voice of song, when the world lacks the ear of taste?

taste songs

Every individual has a place to fill in the world and is important.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
When man is a brute, he is the most sensual and loathsome of all brutes.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
She poured out the liquid music of her voice to quench the thirst of his spirit.

singing

The fiend in his own shape is less hideous than when he rages in the breast of man.

rage

Generosity consists not in the sum given, but in the manner in which it is bestowed.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
The world, that gray-bearded and wrinkled profligate, decrepit, without being venerable.

the world

Religion and art spring from the same root and are close kin. Economics and art are strangers.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

art

Let men tremble to win the hand of woman, unless they win along with it the utmost passion of her heart.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
Life, within doors, has few pleasanter prospects than a neatly-arranged and well-provisioned breakfast-table.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

food

We sometimes congratulate ourselves at the moment of waking from a troubled dream; it may be so the moment after death.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

death

The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease. The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

ambition

Bees are sometimes drowned (or suffocated) in the honey which they collect. So some writers are lost in their collected learning.

writers

Our Creator would never have made such lovely days and have given us the deep hearts to enjoy them unless we were meant to be immortal.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

immortality God nature

Happiness is as a butterfly, which, when pursued, is always beyond our grasp, but which, if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
Happiness in this world, when it comes, comes incidentally.  Make it the object of pursuit, and it leads us [on] a wild-goose chase, and is never attained.

pursuit happiness

No man, for any considerable time, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne

character be yourself

No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.

hypocrisy authenticity

The greatest obstacle to being heroic is the doubt whether one may not be going to prove one's self a fool; the truest heroism is to resist the doubt; and the profoundest wisdom, to know when it ought to be resisted, and when to be obeyed.

obstacles heroism

Have you ever read the novels of Anthony Trollope? They precisely suit my taste; solid and substantial, written on strength of beef and through inspiration of ale, and just as real as if some giant had hewn a great lump out of the earth, and put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business, and not suspecting that they were made a show of.
— Nathaniel Hawthorne
It is a curious subject of observation and inquiry, whether hatred and love be not the same thing at bottom.  Each, in its utmost development, supposes a high degree of intimacy and heart-knowledge; each renders one individual dependent for the food of his affections and spiritual life upon another; each leaves the passionate lover, or the no less passionate hater, forlorn and desolate by the withdrawal of his object.

love and hate

It is a curious subject of observation and inquiry, whether hatred and love be not the same thing at the bottom. Each, in its utmost development, supposes a high degree of intimacy and heart-knowledge; each renders one individual dependent for the food of his affections and spiritual life upon another; each leaves the passionate lover, or the no less passionate hater, forlorn and desolate by the withdrawal of his object. Philosophically considered, therefore, the two passions seem essentially the same, except that one happens to be seen in a celestial radiance and the other in a dusky and lurid glow.