Dame Edith Sitwell Quotes

Most popular Dame Edith Sitwell Quotes

Good taste is the worst vice ever invented.

taste

My poems are hymns of praise to the glory of life.

poets

My personal hobbies are reading, listening to music and silence.
— Dame Edith Sitwell

personal silence

I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.
— Dame Edith Sitwell

stupidity

I am patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it.

stupidity

What an artist is for is to tell us what we see but do not know that we see.

artists

I am one of those unhappy persons who inspire bores to the highest flights of their art.

boring people

Rhythm might be described as, to the world of sound, what light is to the world of sight.
It is as unseeing to ask what is the use of poetry as it would be to ask what is the use of religion.

poetry

When we think of cruelty, we must try to remember the stupidity, the envy, the frustration from which it has arisen.

cruelty

All great poetry is dipped in the dyes of the heart, and is, in Emerson's phrase, "a larger imbibing of the common heart."

poetry

Why not be oneself? That is the whole secret of a successful appearance. If one is a Greyhound, why try to look like a Pekinese?
— Dame Edith Sitwell
Remember only this of our hopeless love
That never till Time is done
Will the fire of the heart and the fire of the mind be one.
— Dame Edith Sitwell Life

head and heart

The aim of flattery is to soothe and encourage us by assuring us of the truth of an opinion we have already formed about ourselves.
— Dame Edith Sitwell

flattery

Why not be oneself?  That is the whole secret of a successful appearance.  If one is a greyhound, why try to look like a Pekingese?

advisory be yourself

In later years the great novelist who was known as George Eliot had, in spite of her ugliness, a monolithic, mysterious, primeval grandeur of countenance, like that of an Easter Island statue, washed by oceans of light.
Eccentricity is not, as dull people would have us believe, a form of madness. It is often a kind of innocent pride, and the man of genius and the aristocrat are frequently regarded as eccentrics because genius and aristocrat are entirely unafraid of and uninfluenced by the opinions and vagaries of the crowd.

eccentricity