William Wordsworth Quotes

Most popular William Wordsworth Quotes

The child is father of the man.
— William Wordsworth

famous children

Faith is a passionate intuition.
— William Wordsworth

faith

The immortal spirit of one happy day.
— William Wordsworth
We feel that we are greater than we know.
— William Wordsworth
That inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude.
— William Wordsworth

solitude

Nature never did betray
The heart that loved her.
— William Wordsworth

nature

Nature never did betray the heart that loved her.
— William Wordsworth

nature

Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.
— William Wordsworth

writing advice

Golf is a day spent in a round of strenuous idleness.
— William Wordsworth

golf

Wisdom is ofttimes nearer when we stoop than when we soar.
— William Wordsworth

wisdom

Wisdom is ofttimes nearer when we stoop
Than when we soar.

wisdom

Minds that have nothing to confer find little to perceive.
— William Wordsworth
Sweet childish days, that were long as twenty days are now.
— William Wordsworth
A mind forever voyaging through strange seas of thought, alone.
— William Wordsworth
Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.
— William Wordsworth
And 'tis my faith, that every flower enjoys the air it breathes.
— William Wordsworth
Strongest minds
Are often those of whom the noisy world
Hears least.

mind

Strongest minds are often those of whom the noisy world hears least.
— William Wordsworth
Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, but to be young was very heaven!
— William Wordsworth
The marble index of a mind forever
Voyaging through strange seas of thought, alone.
— William Wordsworth
To me the meanest flower that blows can give thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.
— William Wordsworth
The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, lie scattered at the feet of man like flowers.
— William Wordsworth
A noble aim,
Faithfully kept, is as a noble deed,
In whose pure sight all virtue doth succeed.
— William Wordsworth

goals

The best portion of a good man's life are his nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and love.
— William Wordsworth
Dreams, books, are each a world; and books, we know, are a substantial world, both pure and good.
— William Wordsworth
The best portion of a good man's life is his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love.
— William Wordsworth
That best portion of a good man's life,
His little, nameless, unremembered, acts
Of kindness and of love.
— William Wordsworth

Goodness kindness helping others

One impulse from a vernal wood may teach you more of man, of moral evil and of good, than all the sages can.
— William Wordsworth
Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: It takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquilly.
— William Wordsworth
Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.
— William Wordsworth

emotion poetry

In modern business it is not the crook who is to be feared most, it is the honest man who doesn't know what he is doing.
— William Wordsworth

business

All good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.

poetry

Every great and original writer, in proportion as he is great and original, must himself create the taste by which he is to be relished.
— William Wordsworth

creativity

Thought and theory must precede all action that moves to salutary purposes. Yet action is nobler in itself than either thought or theory.

action

The Poet binds together by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society, as it is spread over the whole earth, and over all time.
— William Wordsworth
Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting. Not in entire forgetfulness, and not in utter nakedness, but trailing clouds of glory do we come.
— William Wordsworth

glory birth

The reason firm, the temperate will, endurance, foresight, strength, and skill; A perfect woman, nobly planned, to warn, to comfort, and command.
— William Wordsworth
The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
— William Wordsworth

nature

What though the radiance which was once so bright
Be now forever taken from my sight,
Though nothing can bring back the hour
Of splendor in the grass, glory in the flower;
We will grieve not, rather find
Strength in what remains behind.

age

I have seen
a curious child, who dwelt upon a tract
of inland ground, applying to his ear
The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell,
To which, in silence hushed, his very soul
Listened intensely, and his countenance soon
Brightened with joy.

joy